Saturday December 20th 2014

How does Vicodin work?

How does Vicodin work?

Vicodin is an opioid medication that’s used to treat moderate to severe pain. Vicodin affect the body and brain via its main ingredient, hydrocodone. Although Vicodin does not have the same effects for everyone, Vicodin is an effective and strong pain reliever with a relatively high addiction liability.  In fact, feeling high on Vicodin is what affects how Vicodin is prescribed. More here on how Vicodin works, with a section at the end for your questions.

How does Vicodin affect the brain and nervous system?

Vicodin contains hydrocodone, an opium-derived synthetic substance. Hydrocodone is not a true opiate, as it does not occur in nature, but has been created in a laboratory to mimic the effects and action of morphine, a derivative of opium.  Still, the narcotic schedule Vicodin places Vicodin as one of the more psychoactive prescription medications which can  produce euphoria.  But how does Vicodin work in the brain?

Vicodin works by binding to opiate receptors in the brain, which helps to lessen the feelings and perception of pain. Specifically, hydrocodone acts on endorphin receptors call mu receptors and kappa receptors in the central nervous system. As a result, hydrocodone can cause analgesia (pain relief), sedation, respiratory depression and euphoric feelings, causing a “high.”

How does Vicodin work in the body?

As an opioid, Vicodin is a central nervous system depressant. This means it slows brain activity and as a result, can affect other parts of the body. The depressant qualities of Vicodin can result in:

  • dizziness
  • drowsiness
  • impaired coordination
  • loss of consciousness
  • nausea/vomiting
  • overdose
  • shallow breathing
  • slowed heart rate

Serious and life-threatening side effects are more likely to occur when Vicodin is not taken as directed.

How fast does Vicodin work

Vicodin hits its peak blood plasma in 1.3 hours. Some people crush and snort the powder from Vicodin tablets to try to get more immediate effects, but this is dangerous and can result in increased adverse effects, nasal infections, or overdose.

How long does Vicodin work?

Vicodin’s effects can last anywhere from 4-6 hours depending on the person and the dose. Vicodin needs to be taken throughout the day to manage pain, but never more frequently than prescribed.

What makes Vicodin work better

Vicodin should not be taken along with other central nervous system depressants like alcohol or benzodiazepines. This is because the main ingredient in Vicodin – hydrocodone – can cause excessive drowsiness, and is dangerous when mixed with other medications. Furthermore, Vicodin needs to be taken exactly as directed, and not crushed, chewed, or snorted.

Does Vicodin work for everyone?

No. Vicodin is not right for everyone. Vicodin is habit-forming, so it’s not recommended for those with a history of drug or alcohol abuse. In some people, Vicodin can have serious side effects or cause an allergic reaction. Additionally, there may be other medications you’re taking which interact with Vicodin, so always check with your pharmacist before taking any new medications.Anyone who experiences problems while taking Vicodin should talk to their doctor immediately about discontinuing the medication.

How Vicodin works questions

Still have questions about Vicodin and how it works? Please leave your questions about Vicodin here. We try to answer all legitimate Vicodin questions ASAP with a personal and prompt response.

Reference Sources: Mississippi State Department of Health: Pharmacology Drugs that Affect the Central Nervous System:
DEA: Hydrocodone
Medline Plus: Hydrocodone
ToxNet: Hydrocodone

Photo credit: Department of Justice DEA narcotics photos

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4 Responses to “How does Vicodin work?
Marilyn
4:10 am July 25th, 2014

I have been prescribed hydrocodone 10 mg every 6 hours for chronic pain for almost 2 yrs. I only take about 2-3 per day, but now my doctor has stopped prescribing it for chronic pain use. I only have aboout 3 days supply left. Will I suffer withdrawal? Should there be a tapering off?

Ivana @ Addiction Blog
10:50 am July 29th, 2014

Hello Marilyn. After taking a medication like hydrocodone as often and as long as you have, it’s almost inevitable to get withdrawal symptoms soon after you stop taking it. Talk to your doctor and ask to get you on a tapering schedule instead of just cutting your supply all at once. Also ask for some other alternatives to help you with the management of your pain. Let us know how it all goes.

Devon
9:56 pm November 20th, 2014

Is Vicodin/Hydrocodone a psychoactive drug

Ivana @ Addiction Blog
2:54 pm November 24th, 2014

Hi Devon. Vicodin is an analgesic, also known as painkiller. Analgesics, along with depressants, antihistamines, tranquilizers, euphoriants, hallucinogens, stimulants and inhalants are all psychoactive drugs.

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