Wednesday April 23rd 2014

Snorting Suboxone

Snorting and getting high on Suboxone effects range from sweating to overdose.  You can even trigger opiate withdrawal.  So, if you’re thinking about snorting Suboxone, you should know what happens.

In the interest of opioid harm reduction, we review what happens in the body while snorting Suboxone, as well as the dangers and safety concerns of snorting Suboxone. We welcome questions about snorting Suboxone at the end of this article, and will try to answer all legitimate questions with a personal reply ASAP.

Suboxone: What are you really snorting?

Suboxone is a prescription drug used to treat opiate addiction. Suboxone works by reducing opiate cravings and withdrawal symptoms. The active ingredient in Suboxone are buprenorphine hydrochloride and naloxone. Inactive ingredients may include lactose mannitol, cornstartch, povidine, citric acid, sodium citrate, magnesium stearate, acesulfame potassium, and flavoring agents. So if you snort Suboxone, you insufflate not only buprenorphine, but also these additional additives. And regardless of how you take it,  Suboxone shows up on a drug test when specifically targeted.

How does snorting Suboxone affect the body?

Suboxone affects the central nervous system. By binding to opioid receptors in the brain,Suboxone has similar effects to stronger opiate painkillers, which is why it’s used to help those struggling with opiate addiction. But Suboxone effects reach a “ceiling” at doses higher than 16-32 mg. In other words, in doses higher than 16 mg, Suboxone ceases to have further effects. So taking too much Suboxone is also likely to precipitate an opiate withdrawal. However, it’s possible to abuse and become addicted to Suboxone as well. This risk of Suboxone addiction increases when you snort Suboxone to try to get high.

Snorting Suboxone side effects

Taking Suboxone can cause opiate withdrawal effects as a side effect of taking the medication. This is more likely when the medication is taken in high doses – so not only are you unlikely to experience enhanced effects by snorting Suboxone, but it could also cause you to experience unpleasant and painful withdrawals. These possible side effects of snorting Suboxone include:

  • drug cravings
  • fever
  • insomnia
  • irritability
  • stomach pain
  • sweating

Snorting Suboxone to get high

Snorting Suboxone provides a fairly lackluster “high.” Just as with any drug, when you Snort Suboxone, the action causes large amounts of buprenorphine to instantly hit the bloodstream and cross the blood-brain barrier. This instant effect is dangerous, because it causes Suboxone can place you at risk of overdose or toxicity as you try to get high. If you are tolerance of opioids, you may be less likely to overdose on Suboxone because it’s comparatively weaker than similar medications. But it’s still a risk.

Snorting Suboxone vs oral

Suboxone is only intended to be taken orally – the tablet is placed beneath the tongue and is absorbed into the bloodstream from the mouth. Oral preparations are safer than snorted Suboxone, because the dose is more controlled. Crushing and snorting Suboxone may cause a quicker onset of effects, causing almost immediate relief of opiate withdrawal symptoms. But it’s also more dangerous, especially because higher doses don’t correlate to more intense effects.

Snorting Suboxone dangers

Snorting Suboxone has some serious side effects. First, it can cause opiate withdrawal. Second, (and you may not have thought about this), snorting any drug can harm your nasal passages over time, and even spread disease if you share snorting instruments with others. Third, snorting Suboxone definitely increases the risk that you will become addicted to the medication. And, finally, when you snort Suboxone it is possible to overdose on Suboxone.

Snorting Suboxone safely

Suboxone should never be snorted. The large doses of the medication all at once won’t give you better effects versus oral administration. In fact, at doses higher than 16-32 mg, the medication reaches a “ceiling effect” and ceases to have further effects. Taking too much Suboxone is also likely to precipitate an opiate withdrawal, which is an incredibly unpleasant price to pay for a fairly lackluster “high.”

Snorting Suboxone questions

Do you still have questions about snorting Suboxone? If so, please let us know. We respond to all Suboxone questions with a personal and prompt reply.

Reference Sources: SAMHSA: About Buprenorphine Therapy
Medline Plus: Buprenorphine Sublingual
FDA: Subutex and Suboxone Questions and Answers

Photo credit: --Tico--

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16 Responses to “Snorting Suboxone
kyle drew
7:53 pm June 22nd, 2012

do you need less of soboxone if you snort it than oral

1:56 am June 26th, 2012

Hello kyle drew. We do not suggest nor condone snorting drugs and cannot post information about how to snort suboxone here.

Darrell
7:14 pm February 28th, 2013

I know someone who says they only snort 1/4 of a suboxone. Is that possible? Because when I see that person they really look like they’re out of it. Thank you

Robin
4:57 pm May 12th, 2013

Yes it is possible. I’ve been snorting suboxin for 4-5 years and only do about a 1/4 a day. Its spread out throughout the day of course. Detox is horrible when u do them this way though. I have a friend who takes 3 a day orally and he can detox faster and less painful than i can. I dont ever feel high just not sick or in pain. I do not recommend doing suboxin this way. I started cause i couldn’t afford to buy one or two a day anymore. Snorting at first did give me a high for a short period of time but now im just very dependent on them. Worse than i think i would have been if I’d kept taking them the reccommended way. Please dont try this! I’ve become addicted to the snorting process as well. If im out and snort Tylenol it works temporarily only because my brain is telling my body i just got a fix. I have never been addicted to strong pain killers only Vicodin but it can spiral out of control faster than some think. I wish strong pain killers could only be given to patients in an office setting or to severely injured or elderly patients. Most cases they r not ever required. Over the counter meds can work just as well if u havent been introduced to anything stronger. Learn to manage some of the pain in other ways cause long term taking anything else only masks the underlining problem and causes more issues for some in the long run.

Timothy
12:00 am September 30th, 2013

Hello
I have been taking 8mg of suboxone a day for pain management of my right foot. I I use it for a two-week interval / stop four days and resume It. I do this so that I do not get an addictionDo you think that this approach to what I am doing is effective To avoid addiction?. If this is not ! please advise me of a better format. Thank you.

1:21 pm October 2nd, 2013

Hello Timothy. Has the Suboxone been prescribed for treating pain? You can minimize the possibility of chemical dependence by stopping and starting pain medication, it’s generally not prescribed this way. Have you consulted a pharmacist on the efficacy of this practice?

Anon
5:29 pm October 8th, 2013

4 days is barely enough time for the withdrawal from Suboxone to actually kick in. I would maybe try 5-7 days off instead of 4 and see how you feel.

gina
9:26 am November 16th, 2013

I’ve been snorting it for a few months, I’m down to under 0.4 milligrams a day, but when I tried to quit the withdrawal symptoms where terrible. I’m sure me snorting caused the situation. I figured such a low dose won’t create bad withdrawal. I wanted to cut my legs off.I need options for the best route here. I know the first is stop ( snorting), but do you have any information that may help me with the withdrawal war I’m soon to face again. ?

11:19 am November 18th, 2013

Hi Gina. Getting off buprenorphine can be quite a battle. Yes; first start by making the snorted dose a nasal dose. Then, I’d suggest that you seek help with a doctor to address symptoms such as anxiety and panic. Short term use of benzodiazepines may be able to regulate mood. But seek clinical help for an evaluation and possible medications or behavioral interventions that can help.

John8181
6:18 am December 3rd, 2013

I was wondering if snorting subutex can cause more withdrawals when quitting than orally taking the medications? Not while your taking it, but when you quit. Is there a difference in withdrawals between a person who eventually quits snorting subutex compared to someone who takes it orally?

7:48 pm December 3rd, 2013

Hi John. Great question. Hes. Mode of adminsitration can affect severity of withdrawal symptoms. The best process would be to return to oral doses and then slowly taper off buprenorphne before eliminating it for your system totally. Also, seek medical supervision during withdrawal to avoid needless discomfort.

Patrick
11:53 pm January 10th, 2014

I’ve been taking suboxone mis 8-2mg film. My insurance is now covering buprenorphine sub 8mg, I don’t feel the relief and am having a little anxiety. What is the difference

lily
7:23 am January 29th, 2014

I am snorting one mg of suboxone a day. I have been a heroin user for 4 years but have stopped 6 months ago & am 6 months pregnant now. Will I have with drawl symptoms if I stop or is it all in my head? I know for a fact the subs don’t hurt the baby because with my 2nd son I did the same if not more & he came out 9lbs & healthy as can be. I snorted about 2-3 mg up until birth & was able to completely stop after I had him but then relapsed on heroin & now I’m pregnant with my 3rd child, my first girl. So I’m worried if I stop taking the 1 mg now & go through some type of withdrawal that it will hurt my baby? Or will I even have any withdrawal symptoms at all?

11:04 am January 31st, 2014

Hello Lily. Please seek the advice of a qualified doctor and obstetrician. You’ll need a specific answer and information on how to taper or cope with withdrawal while pregnant. And medical supervision.

Dangie
6:07 am February 14th, 2014

What if you are weaning yourself off with a doctor but you snort it instead? Will you still withdrawal?

Gail
6:04 pm March 17th, 2014

I am prescribed suboxone (8-2 mg),I generally take 4-8 mgs per day.i am having surgery within the next couple of months,what is the recommended time I should stop taking suboxone prior to my surgery and when should I continue to start taking them after my surgery?i ask this question because I will be prescribed opiate pain killers after my surgery and do not want to feel any pain after my surgery but also do not want to become dependent on opiate pain killers once again,can you please advise me on the best plan on starting and stopping my suboxone treatment please,thank you in advance.

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