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Hydrocodone

Physical addiction to hydrocodone

Physical addiction to hydrocodone

July 12th, 2016

What is the difference between hydrocodone dependence and addiction? Learn how to recognize the signs and symptoms of a hydrocodone addiction here.

Long term effects of Hydrocodone addiction (INFOGRAPHIC)

Long term effects of Hydrocodone addiction (INFOGRAPHIC)

June 22nd, 2016

Hydrocodone can make you feel “high” which is the main reason why people tend to abuse it. With repetitive use, users experience alteration of their brain chemistry. What happens exactly? More here.

Long term effects of hydrocodone on the brain (INFOGRAPHIC)

Long term effects of hydrocodone on the brain (INFOGRAPHIC)

September 10th, 2015

Hydrocodone is an opiate agonist which binds to opiate receptors in the brain. But are there any long term or negative side effects of hydrocodone on the brain? Explore here.

2 Negative and adverse effects of hydrocodone (INFOGRAPHIC)

Negative and adverse effects of hydrocodone (INFOGRAPHIC)

August 14th, 2015

Hydrocodone can affect you negatively. How? More here.

1 Adverse effects of hydrocodone on the brain (INFOGRAPHIC)

Adverse effects of hydrocodone on the brain (INFOGRAPHIC)

January 3rd, 2015

Hydrocodone has a chemical structure that is related to that of codeine and morphine, and has similar effects on the brain. But how does hydrocodone affect the structure and function of the brain? A list of negative side effects here.

4 Long term effects of hydrocodone on the body (INFOGRAPHIC)

Long term effects of hydrocodone on the body (INFOGRAPHIC)

December 25th, 2014

Nausea and vomiting are common for first time hydrocodone users, as well as dizziness, lightheadedness, and drowsiness. But what about the long term effects of hydrocodone on the body? More here.

10 Signs and symptoms of hydrocodone addiction

Signs and symptoms of hydrocodone addiction

February 14th, 2014

Hydrocodone addiction can occur in anyone using prescription medications that contain hydrocodone. Here, we explore the main signs and symptoms of hydrocodone addiction and what you can do to identify and address hydrocodone addiction.

144 How to withdraw from hydrocodone

How to withdraw from hydrocodone

November 1st, 2013

Practical suggestions for how to withdraw from hydrocodone safely. Plus. a section on How to ease withdrawal symptoms from hydrocodone. More here.

8 How is hydrocodone abused?

How is hydrocodone abused?

August 27th, 2013

You abuse hydrocodone anytime you take hydrocodone other than prescribed, or use hydrocodone for euphoric effect. More on the definition of hydrocodone abuse here.

19 Hydrocodone withdrawal treatment: How to treat hydrocodone withdrawal

Hydrocodone withdrawal treatment: How to treat hydrocodone withdrawal

June 12th, 2013

What’s the best way to withdraw from hydrocodone? Hydrocodone withdrawal treatment should ideally be individualized by case. But you can treat flu-like symptoms that occur during hydrocodone withdrawal using over-the-counter and prescription medications. More on how to treat hydrocodone withdrawal here.

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Hydrocodone

What is hydrocodone?

Hydrocodone is a a semi-synthetic opioid derived from codeine. Hydrocodone is in a group of drugs called narcotic pain relievers. It is a Schedule II or Schedule III drug (this varies as a result of different formulations) available only in combination with other ingredients, specifically intended for oral use. In fact, hydrocodone is contained in hundreds of prescription medications as an active ingredient.

Hydrocodone comes as a tablet, a capsule, syrup, a solution, an extended-release (long-acting) capsule, and an extended-release (long-acting) suspension (liquid) to take by mouth.

Why do people use hydrocodone?

Doctors prescribe hydrocodone as a narcotic analgesic (pain reliever) and a cough medicine, usually combined with paracetamol (acetaminophen) or ibuprofen.  Basically, hydrocodone is used to treat moderate to severe pain and as a medicine to treat cold and cough.

However, many hydrocodone users take higher doses to achieve a sense of extreme well-being and euphoria. But taking hydrocodone OTHER THAN PRESCRIBED is considered drug abuse and is illegal.

Hydrocodone effects

When used as prescribed and with caution, hydrocodone relieves pain by changing the way the brain and nervous system respond to pain. It also relieves cough by decreasing activity in the part of the brain that causes coughing.

In higher doses, one of the most common effects of this narcotic is a warm and pleasant numbing sensation that stretches throughout the body. At the same time, many report a warming of the abdominal area, and sometimes a pleasant cooling in the lungs.

Hydrocodone may also cause side effects, upon which a patient should consult with a doctor and probably stop using the medication. Some possible negative side effects of hydrocodone include:

  • anxiety
  • constipation
  • impaired brain activity
  • impaired lung function
  • nausea
  • rashes
  • vomiting

There is also a deadly side to hydrocodone abuse. If users take too many pills or if they mix hydrocodone with other drugs or alcohol (especially central nervous system depressants like alcohol or benzodiazepines), the outcome can be fatal. Also, in long-term users, the body builds up tolerance to the prescription medication. Increased tolerance to hydrocodone after daily dosing for a period of a few weeks or more can increase risk of overdose. When abused for a longer period, hydrocodone causes liver damage and liver failure, which can also lead to death.

Is hydrocodone addictive?

Yes, hydrocodone is addictive. Because of the euphoric effects it causes, people may develop patterns of abuse which lead to addiction. Even after only several weeks of use, people can develop physical and psychological dependence to hydrocodone. Symptoms common among hydrocodone addicts include:

  • compulsive use of hydrocodone
  • continued hydrocodone use despite the awareness of negative consequences to health, home, work or social life
  • craving hydrocodone
  • loss of control over dosing amounts and frequency
  • taking hydrocodone to cope with psycho-emotional issues

After your body and brain have become accustomed to the presence of the medication, you can experience hydrocodone withdrawal symptoms if you try to quit suddenly and abruptly. Consult your doctor before lowering doses or stopping altogether. Stopping hydrocodone is much safer when you taper doses down gradually and slowly, and treat symptoms as they occur. Your doctor can help you create a tapering schedule fit to your needs, or refer you to a hydrocodone detox center if you require extra medical help during this period.

Leave a Reply

8 Responses to “Hydrocodone
jag
6:37 pm February 26th, 2016

If hydrocordone is snorted, will it still appear in a urine test in 3 to 5 days?

Lydia @ Addiction Blog
2:40 pm March 3rd, 2016

Hi, Jag. Regardless of mode of administration, hydrocodone stays in the system and may be detected on a urine test up to 2-5 days.

Lane
6:56 pm March 26th, 2016

Will prescription use of hydrocodone test positive for codeine?

Lydia @ Addiction Blog
3:08 pm April 7th, 2016

Hi Lane. Codeine will show up as an opiate.

phyllis
4:13 am April 24th, 2016

When I was in my mid-40s and partying (once or twice a week) I would drink beer (up to perhaps eight or 10) and take vicodin (maybe four or five over a six-hour period) and on the same take day I would take perhaps 10 altogether over 24 hpurs. I could drink much more without feeling or acting drunk, however I must have been. Also, any hangovers were minimized with a vicodin in the a.m. The other days (five or six days a week) I didn’t drink alcohol at all but I still took vicodin (six or eight a day). Why did I never have those reactions or responses that were typical. I have never read of anyone with my reactions. Its been 20 years now and have never had an answer to this question. I’d love to know.

penny
2:23 am June 15th, 2016

Hi everyone, I’ve recently quit taking vicodin.. I’ve been abusing vicodin for close to 13 years. I’d been in the same situation about 20 years ago (hard to believe) and only started again the night my Dad died. Thank goodness I was vicodin free the three years he was sick (cancer) and I was able to help my Mom care for him. We had a vicodin rx for him but I was never once tempted until he lay dying. I’m a Daddy’s girl and I just decided I needed to be fortified that night. But that started the addiction again. Not that vicodin ever really made anything better. Seriously, I never felt great when I was taking it, it just felt like kind of a shield. For family gatherings, or social occasions I felt like I would enjoy it only if I had vicodin. My rx was for 5/325. I never took more than one at a time but I’ve taken up to 10 in a day. Over the last few months, my doctor has reduced the number of refills. . I guess I’ve been pondering the problem for a few months and when my supply was running low this past two weeks and I had another 2 weeks before I could expect a refill I just started dosing down. I was just sick of it but of course terrified of withdrawals. When I quit 20 years ago it was cold turkey and I was just freaked out. This time I took 1/2 a pill twice a day and than once a day and then my last 1/2 pill was sunday. I’ve been taking effexor and wellbutrin for a few years and also some xanax and ambient and I’ve been taking some of the supplements recommended in the Thomas recipe too. I’m not feeling too bad

karen
3:56 am September 5th, 2016

I go to a pain clinic and they drug test every month for 3 or 4 months my drug test come back negative for hydrocodone but I take them daily as prescribed. It was recently brought to my attention that water pills can cause a false drug screen Is that true?

1:05 pm September 7th, 2016

Hi Karen. Water pills may be the cause for a false drug screen because they help your body get rid of the unneeded water. Did you tell the toxicologist that you use water pills? Every time before taking drug test, tell the professionals which medications you use because they may affect the test results.

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