Friday October 31st 2014

Top 10 addictive sleep aids

Sleeping pills are hypnotic drugs

Sleeping pills are used to get you to sleep, or to keep you asleep. The drugs are psychoactive, which means that they cross the blood – brain barrier and act on the central nervous system, including the brain. Sleeping pills are classed as hypnotic, or soporific, drugs and can be extremely habit forming. In fact, some people come to rely on sleeping pills to get to sleep and cannot sleep without them.

Will I become a sleeping pill addict?

Although sleeping pills can be addictive, this does not mean that everyone who takes them will become a pill addict. In fact, people generally develop a physical tolerance to the most well-known and used types of sleeping pills (benzodiazepines) after a short 1 – 2 weeks of taking them. Regardless of the build up of physical tolerance (needing more drug to achieve the same original effects), addiction is further characterized by these requirements:

* continued use of sleeping pills despite negative consequences related to their use
* obsessive thoughts about sleeping pills
* experiencing cravings for taking or using sleeping pills
* withdrawal symptoms when you stop taking sleeping pills

Top 10 additive sleeping pills

1. Ambien, Ambien CR (zolpidem)

2. Ativan (lorazepam)

3. Edluar (zolpidem)

4. Estazolam

5. Halcion (triazolam)

6. Klonopin (clonazepam)

7. Lunesta (eszopiclone)

8. Restoril (temazepam)

9. Rozeram (ramelteon)

10. Sonata (zaleplon)

Do you have a sleeping pill addiction problem?

Addiction is no longer stigmatized as a moral deficiency, but as a medical and mental health condition. If you think that you have a sleeping pill problem, you probably do. Check with your prescribing doctor and report symptoms and behaviors so that you can work together to identify next steps. Or post here and let us know what’s happening. We’ll try to help you as best we can!

Reference source: National Library of Medicine Medline Plus Medical Encyclopedia for “Sleeping difficulty” and “Hypnotics”

Photo credit: masha_k_sh

Leave a Reply

7 Responses to “Top 10 addictive sleep aids
jOSEPH
8:12 pm June 20th, 2011

Would you recommend i not even try prescription pills altogether?

7:52 pm July 2nd, 2011

Hi Joseph. Every person is different. But I do think that most people would prefer to learn to sleep without sleeping aids. I’d recommend that you talk with a doctor about your options, including alternatives to sleeping pills, before you make your own personal decision.

hannah
9:15 am November 2nd, 2011

Hi,

My partner is addicted to sleeping tablets, he is on 7.5mg zimovane and also some anti psycotics which make him sleepy too, he can take seven of the zimovane and it wont do anything. He has developed a really high tolerance to them but without them doesnt sleep till around 6:00 am and then misses all his college work. What should we do to get him into a normal sleeping pattern again? Can we stop the medication all together for a while and then start him on a low dose again?

Thanks, Hannah

7:47 pm November 2nd, 2011

Hi Hannah. It sounds like your partner needs to ask this question to a psychiatrist who prescribes both anti psychotics and sleeping pills. Does he have a prescribing doctor at the moment? Is he ready to try to feel better and sleep unassisted?

sroy
7:55 pm December 26th, 2011

We reccomend that Sleeping aids be taken only at the direction of a physician and only for a limited period of time to avoid the possiblity fo addiction

john
7:55 pm September 6th, 2014

I rake 4 x 1 mg Lorazepam tablets at bedtime. Is it safe to cut this to 3 tablets?

Thank you

2:53 pm September 10th, 2014

Hello John. We recommend that you seek medical supervision from your prescribing doctor before reducing (or increasing) dosage on any medication.

Leave a Reply